Category: History

Notes on Iggers (1995) Historicism: The History and Meaning of the Term

The article by Georg G. Iggers (1926-2017) is heavily saturated with relevant information on the topic of historicism. I recommend it for anyone interested in the development of historical studies. It was well-written and included topics for future research at the end. He was… Continue Reading “Notes on Iggers (1995) Historicism: The History and Meaning of the Term”

Notes on Lee & Beck (1954)

Lee & Beck provided a solid introduction into the various definitions of historicism and offered at the end two definitions of their own. The first definition they give places historicism in the service of evaluation, where it plays the role of determining the “truth,… Continue Reading “Notes on Lee & Beck (1954)”

The Fathers of History In French

The information in this article was originally collected by Evan Benton from the 21st to the 25th of February 2021. I edited it the night of February 25th and organized the original data. The concise results:Saturn (1646)Herodotus (1735) Expanded 1. Saturn (Chronos) “C’est pour… Continue Reading “The Fathers of History In French”

The Fathers of Astronomy

I searched Google Ngram Viewer for “Father of Astronomy”, 1500-2019, English (2019), Case-Insensitive. Fathers of Astronomy:1635 – Hipparchus of Bithynia (C2nd BCE)1754 – Claudius Ptolemy (C2nd CE)1803 – Nicholas Copernicus (1473-1543 CE)1833 – The Biblical Enoch1838 – Thales of Miletus (c. 620 B.C.E.—c. 546… Continue Reading “The Fathers of Astronomy”

The Eleven Fathers of History: A Summary Of The First Study Into Who Has Been Called The Father Of History And When

It was in the December 2020 that I decided to conduct a study into who all had been called the father of history (or father of scientific history) and when they had been called it. To this day (28 Jan, 2021), I’m still not… Continue Reading “The Eleven Fathers of History: A Summary Of The First Study Into Who Has Been Called The Father Of History And When”

The Hebrew Calendar

The day is from one sundown to another. It has a seven day week where all the days were named the numbers 1 through 6 and the 7th was named the Sabbath.[1, p.31] Sunday marks the start of the week.[2, p.113] The days consist… Continue Reading “The Hebrew Calendar”

The History of Printing

printing-press-ctruth-history

“But it was when printing gave us the daily press that it did the chief service to chronology. Every newspaper is headed with the day, month, and year, according to the different eras in vogue in different nations.”James Cecil Macdonald (1897)[1, p.78] History 593… Continue Reading “The History of Printing”

Etymonline’s Sources

Etymonline has been one of my go-to references for etymological information. The list of sources provided on their website is ordered alphabetically and is split into two parts. My article here provides a useful reorganization of their two part list into a single list… Continue Reading “Etymonline’s Sources”

The Islamic Calendar

The Islamic calendar is a lunar calendar. Its year either has 354 or 355 days. In the Quran, Mohammed banned the use of intercalary months.[1, p.27] The calendar counts its years from the year when Mohammed fled from Mecca to Medina (622 CE). This… Continue Reading “The Islamic Calendar”

The Chinese Calendar

The Chinese calendar is a lunisolar calendar. The new moon signaled the first of the lunar month. Their solar year had 12 months each containing either 30 or 31 days. A thirteenth month was added every 2 or 3 years to account for the… Continue Reading “The Chinese Calendar”

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