Category: History

The Islamic Calendar

The Islamic calendar is a lunar calendar. Its year either has 354 or 355 days. In the Quran, Mohammed banned the use of intercalary months.[1, p.27] The calendar counts its years from the year when Mohammed fled from Mecca to Medina (622 CE). This… Continue Reading “The Islamic Calendar”

The Chinese Calendar

The Chinese calendar is a lunisolar calendar. The new moon signaled the first of the lunar month. Their solar year had 12 months each containing either 30 or 31 days. A thirteenth month was added every 2 or 3 years to account for the… Continue Reading “The Chinese Calendar”

The Jewish Calendar

The Jewish calendar is a lunar calendar. It is still in use today but has changed a number of times throughout history.[1, p.25] The Jewish week has 7 days because it is based on the creation story in Genesis.[1, p.26] The 12 months of… Continue Reading “The Jewish Calendar”

The Roman Calendar

The founding of Rome is generally typically placed in the year 753 BCE and this is the point from which all other years are counted on the Roman calendar.[2, p.13] The Roman calendar originally had 10 months. The year began on the spring equinox… Continue Reading “The Roman Calendar”

The Seven Liberal Arts

History C4th CE: Martianus Capella’s Satyricon established a set of seven liberal arts and they became common in the curriculums of pagan schools.[1, pp.97-98] C6th CE: Parts of the Christian world began studying the seven liberal arts. The key figure in introducing the seven… Continue Reading “The Seven Liberal Arts”

The History of Timekeeping

“…timekeeping was critical to the birth of modern science…”[1, p.83]Ken Mondschein (2020) The practice of starting the day at midnight and splitting the day into AM and PM originated with the Romans.[1, p.33] Some people have argued that Stonehenge is an example of an… Continue Reading “The History of Timekeeping”

Anno Domini

Anno Domini means “year of the Lord”. It is abbreviated as “AD” and is equivalent to “CE”. History C6th CE: Dionysius Exiguus calculated the birth of Jesus Christ.[1, p.10] “In fact, it was afterwards discovered that Dionysius had miscalculated the first date in his… Continue Reading “Anno Domini”

Andrew Ellicott Douglass

Andrew Ellicott Douglass (1867-1962) is commonly hailed as the father of dendrochronology. He was a husband, a scientist, an astronomer, a teacher, an inventor, a mountain climber, and many other things. There are some contradictory reports about his life but all of the reports… Continue Reading “Andrew Ellicott Douglass”

How to Start Studying History

History refers to all the events which have ever taken place. Figuring out how to study history can be a complicated task but it does not have to be. I wrote this article to provide a general framework which can be used by people… Continue Reading “How to Start Studying History”

The Antikythera Mechanism

“Nothing like this instrument is preserved elsewhere. Nothing comparable to it is known from any ancient scientific text or literally allusion.”[3, p.60]– Derek J. de Solla Price (1959) The Antikythera Mechanism was an analog computer fashioned out of bronze that linked “the technical calendars… Continue Reading “The Antikythera Mechanism”

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