Third Roman Empire in the 3rd-4th centuries

This article contains a list by Fomenko titled “Third Roman Empire in the 3rd-4th centuries”. However, this list starts in the 4th century and ends in the 6th century. This list can be found in [1]. Despite the title given by Fomenko, this line of rulers may be more accurately named “Third Roman Empire in the 4th-6th centuries”. This Empire lasted for a total of 203 years

Fomenko cites [74] as, J. Blair, ‘Blair’s Chronological and Historical Tables from the Creation to the Present Time etc.’, G. Bell & Sons, London 1882. I found an English edition from 1884 that is available for free online. It is in this article’s references as [2]. Fomenko’s list names Odoacer later than Blair’s, a graph for each has been posted below to show what the movement does to the points.

Constantius II was made Caesar by his father in 324. Blair’s table marks Constantius II’s reign as beginning in 337, as this is the year when he gains the status of Augustus when his father dies. For this reason, the graphs below ignore the 24 year reign and show the 37 year reign.

Fomenko cites [288] as, R. Cagnat, ‘Cours, d’epigraphie latine 4 ed.’, A. Fontemoing, Paris, 1914. I found an 1898 version available for free online. It is in this article’s references as [3].

The fundamental list below is found in [1], the texts after the first “/” are the differences found in [2].

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1 – Constantius II 324-361 (37) / 337-360 (24)

2 – Theodosius I 379-395 (16) / 379-394 (16)

3 – Arcadius 395-408 (13) / 395-407 (13)

4 – Theodosius II 408-450 (42) / 408-449 (42)

5 – Constantine III 407-411 (4)

6 – Leo I 457-474 (17) / 457-473 (17)

7 – Zeno 474-491 (17) / 474-490 (17)

8 – Theodoric 493-526 (33) / 493-525 (33)

9 – Anastasius 491-518 (27) / 491-517 (27)

10 – Odoacer 476-493 (17) / 476-492 (17)

11 – Justin I 518-527 (9) / 518-526 (9)

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Fomenko’s points
Blair’s points
Overlapping them results in a shift of the peak one point to the left or right, the other points remains in almost the same exact shape, being a straight line before the peak, followed by an almost straight line and a straight line after the peak.

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References;

1 – “Vol. 2: The Analysis of Ancient and Mediaeval Records”, page 23

2 – https://archive.org/details/blairschronologi00blairich/page/n12

3 – https://archive.org/details/coursdpigraphi00cagn/page/n8

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