Stopping Mis/Disinformation Vol. 1

This article contains links to other articles that deal with mitigating misinformation. It contains 19 entries that were published between 2019 and 2022.

Vol. 1

Boman, Courtney D. “Examining characteristics of prebunking strategies to overcome PR disinformation attacks”. Public Relations Review, Volume 47, Issue 5, 2021, 102105, ISSN 0363-8111, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pubrev.2021.102105.

Faesen, Louk, et al. Red Lines & Baselines: Towards a European Multistakeholder Approach to Counter Disinformation. Hague Centre for Strategic Studies, 2021, http://www.jstor.org/stable/resrep36478.

Guan, Tianru and Liu, Tianyang and Yuan, Randong Facing disinformation: Five methods to counter conspiracy theories amid the Covid-19 pandemic. Comunicar, 2021, vol. 29, n. 69, pp. 71-83. [Journal article (Paginated)]. http://eprints.rclis.org/42713/

Jackson, Michael, and Paul Lieber. “Countering Disinformation: Are We Our Own Worst Enemy?” The Cyber Defense Review, vol. 5, no. 2, Army Cyber Institute, 2020, pp. 45–56, https://www.jstor.org/stable/26923521.

JANKOWICZ, NINA. AVOIDING THE BAND-AID EFFECT IN INSTITUTIONAL RESPONSES TO DISINFORMATION AND HYBRID THREATS. German Marshall Fund of the United States, 2019, http://www.jstor.org/stable/resrep21230.

Kaiser, Ben, Jerry Wei, Eli Lucherini, Kevin Lee, J. Nathan Matias, Jonathan Mayer. “Adapting Security Warnings to Counter Online Disinformation” (11-13 Aug. 2021). https://www.usenix.org/conference/usenixsecurity21/presentation/kaiser

Kula, S., Kozik, R. & Choraś, M. “Implementation of the BERT-derived architectures to tackle disinformation challenges.” Neural Comput & Applic (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00521-021-06276-0

Lewandowsky, Stephan. Climate Change Disinformation and How to Combat It. Vol. 42:1-21 (Volume publication date April 2021). First published as a Review in Advance on December 23, 2020
https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-publhealth-090419-102409.

Lewandowsky, S., Yesilada, M. Inoculating against the spread of Islamophobic and radical-Islamist disinformationCogn. Research 6, 57 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1186/s41235-021-00323-z

Pamment, James. The EU’s Role in Fighting Disinformation: Crafting A Disinformation Framework. Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 2020, http://www.jstor.org/stable/resrep26180.

Pennycook, Gordon, and David G. Rand. “Fighting Misinformation on Social Media Using Crowdsourced Judgments of News Source Quality.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 116, no. 7, National Academy of Sciences, 2019, pp. 2521–26, https://www.jstor.org/stable/26682927.

Pérez-Escolar, Marta, Eva Ordóñez-Olmedo, Purificación Alcaide-Pulido. Fact-Checking Skills And Project-Based Learning About Infodemic And Disinformation. Thinking Skills and Creativity, Volume 41, 2021. 100887, ISSN 1871-1871. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tsc.2021.100887.

ROBBINS, JOSEPH W., et al. “Countering Russian Disinformation.” The Diversity of Russia’s Military Power: Five Perspectives, edited by Mark F. Cancian and Cyrus Newlin, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), 2020, pp. 32–39, http://www.jstor.org/stable/resrep26533.8.

SCHIFFRIN, ANYA. AI STARTUPS AND THE FIGHT AGAINST ONLINE DISINFORMATION. German Marshall Fund of the United States, 2019, http://www.jstor.org/stable/resrep21240.

Seo, Hyunjin, & Robert Faris. “Comparative Approaches to Mis/Disinformation| Introduction.” International Journal of Communication [Online], 15 (2021): 8. Web. 20 Feb. 2022. https://ijoc.org/index.php/ijoc/article/view/14799

Sultan, Oz. “Tackling Disinformation, Online Terrorism, and Cyber Risks into the 2020s.” The Cyber Defense Review, vol. 4, no. 1, Army Cyber Institute, 2019, pp. 43–60, https://www.jstor.org/stable/26623066.

Ünver, H. Akın. FACT-CHECKERS AND FACT-CHECKING IN TURKEY. Centre for Economics and Foreign Policy Studies, 2020, http://www.jstor.org/stable/resrep26088.

Zerback, Thomas, et al. “The Disconcerting Potential of Online Disinformation: Persuasive Effects of Astroturfing Comments and Three Strategies for Inoculation against Them.” New Media & Society, vol. 23, no. 5, May 2021, pp. 1080–1098, doi:10.1177/1461444820908530.

ZUCKER, ANDREW, et al. “JUST SAY NO!: Teaching Students to Resist Scientifific Misinformation.” The Science Teacher, vol. 87, no. 5, National Science Teachers Association, 2020, pp. 24–29, https://www.jstor.org/stable/27048119.

4 Comments on “Stopping Mis/Disinformation Vol. 1

  1. I’m sure these are all very effective, but they all sound as if they are limited to ‘process’. Do any of them give any guidance as to how ‘disinformation’ is to be distinguished from ‘new information’ i.e. revisionism. I ask because my own work gets dismissed as the former when in reality it should be dismissed for quite other reasons.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Idk. Disinfo is typically defined as purposefully created false info

      If people are calling your work disinfo, my bet is because they think you’re intentionally trying to mislead

      Like

      • Yes of course they are. That was my point. How to teach people the difference. A pretty obvious one is the medium being used. If someone is putting it out to thousands, millions over the internet and it didn’t take long to compose then it could be info or it could be disinfo. But if it is in a book taking years to write and will reach a tiny audience then it must be info.

        Like

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